Scones – Steak House Style Fry Bread

Scones

This type of Scone is popular in the midwest. It’s mostly served in Steak Houses. Some refer to it as the “Utah Scone” because some believe it’s where it originated from. It isn’t the traditional English Scone that looks more like a cookie biscuit. So if you’re looking for that, bummer. You found something better!  I can vouch from personal experience.  I grew up with these served in my School lunch on a regular bases and kids just loved them.  There was even a Restaurant in town called “Scone Cutters” that would serve them any way you wanted them.  You can have these with honey butter, topped like Indian Fry Bread or made like a Sandwich.  It doesn’t really matter and it’s all up to you.  So if you’ve never tried one of these Scones before, you’re in for a real treat.  There’s a nice article written about the history and tradition of scone HERE if you are interested!

Scones 3Scones Ingredients:

1 cup water, hot
1 tablespoon active dry yeast
1/3 cup oil or melted shortening
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup sugar
3 1/2 cups flour, sifted
1 egg, beaten
2 quarts frying oil (i.e., safflower or canola oil)

Mix 3 tablespoons of warm water with yeast adding a pinch of sugar. Set aside for 10 minutes for yeast to activate and foam.  In the meantime, combine hot water, oil (or melted shortening), salt, and sugar in a large bowl.  Once the yeast has activated, add egg to the yeast mixture. Mix well.  Add the egg/yeast mixture to the oil/sugar mixture. Stir well.  Gradually add flour stirring well after each addition. Knead the dough as it stiffens until you get a doughy, elastic consistency. About 5 minutes.  Then place dough in a well-greased bowl, turning once to grease the top. Let dough rise for about 30 minutes or until double in size.  The video below will show you how to fry them.

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Poor Man's Gourmet Kitchen

I’m just a regular guy in search of his bliss and I find that bliss in food and all of its many cultural differences. A very seasoned and experience chef taught me how to use my pallet to best serve and prepare a dish with all of its natural flavors from other foods before ever introducing “forced flavoring”, such as salt. My goal isn’t just to teach how to incorporate these products into simple gourmet dishes but to show, how easy, it can be done from anyone’s Kitchen with cheaper, convenient substitutions that will not only blow your mind, but insure that most no one will be able to ever tell the difference! Welcome to The Poor Man’s Gourmet Kitchen!

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