Dragon Fruit – what does it look like on the inside

Dragon Fruit

Dragon Fruit is Amazing

I always describe Dragon Fruit as, “The Cookies and Cream” fruit, though, it has the texture of a Kiwi, it looks just like ice cream when you split them open.  They grow like flowers on Cacti plants in Mexico and are known as Pitaya or Pitahaya.  They are also cultivated in Southeast Asia, the United States, Israel, Australia, Cyprus and the Canary Islands.

Dragon Fruit

Where to find Dragon Fruit

I found Dragon Fruit at my local Oriental Market.  I bought the last two they had and I paid $1.98 a pound.  I think, between the two, they weighed about 1 1/2 pounds is all.  So they really didn’t cost me that much.  But people have told me that these can be ridiculously priced in standard grocery markets.  I’ve heard upwards of even $8 dollars a piece; which is crazy but if you can find them at lower price, I highly recommend you try one.  I like to squeeze lime juice over the top of mine.  So if you find them, pic up a lime or two for a little extra seasoning because the Dragon fruit tastes like a mild Kiwi.

Other Recipes like Dragon Fruit

I’ve got a ton of Asian food recipes if you search the categories panel under Chinese or Japanese Food.  I’ve also got a few fruits and vegetable videos listed here that you might be interested in, like my, How to cut a Pineapple, Japanese Cold Cucumber and my How to cook an Artichoke.  Other than that, thanks for watching and I hope you enjoy this Dragon Fruit Video.

How to Make Chili Oil

Chili Oil peppers

The Best Chili Oil

Chili Oil is made about once a month, in a large Chinese Restaurant I use to work for, and this literally is the way it’s done.  It’s very straight forward and easy to make.  Of course the Restaurant required more volume so I’ve Dumbed this recipe down quite a bit just to give you what you need for your kitchen.  You can use this oil to spice up many of you’re favorite recipes and it can be added through out the cooking process or served as condiment for individuals to add to their specific tastes.

Chili Oil Ingredients:

1 cup Red Chili’s
2 cups Canola Oil

To make Chili Oil, combine Oil add Red Chili’s in a pan and Heat Oil to 180 degrees Fahrenheit for approximately 5 minutes, then kill the heat and let it rest 2 to 3 hours before straining.  Other ingredients can be added, if you want more flavor than just the heat.  Garlic and Ginger are great examples but the possibilities are endless.

Poor the oil into your favorite receptacle or mason jar for safe storage.  On a side Note, this can irritate your eyes when it’s cooking, so it’s not a bad idea to cook this outside if you have an outside burner on a barbecue or something.  And if you want more potency, crush the red chili’s up and cook with the lid off until there is a Red hue to the Chili Oil.

Chow Mein, Lo Mein and more Chow Mein

Lo Mein/Chow MeinSo many Choices

Do you know the difference between Lo Mein and Chow Mein?  What about the difference between Chow Mein and Chow Mein? Ah, you didn’t know there are two different kinds of Chow Mein?  If you do that’s great, but most people don’t.  I didn’t.  Well at least at the time I was ordering it from a menu and got something I thought was entirely different and not what I was expecting at all.  That experience was years ago but it was the day that I learned the difference between Eastern and Western Chow Mein.

Eastern Chow Mein is what I got when I was expecting something different.  Apparently Western Chow Mein is what I was expecting and if that’s what I wanted from a place that serves the “Eastern” version of Chow Mein, rather, I should have ordered Lo Mein and it would’ve been the same thing.  Are you confused yet?

Western Chow Mein and Lo Mein recipes are virtually the same thing; lots of oily soft noodles with minimal vegetables.  Eastern Chow Mein is practically the opposite with a few variances, but basically lots of vegetables and minimal crispy noodles.  Western Chow Mein is my favorite, though I’ve come to love the Eastern version and often crave that recipe from time to time.  Lo Mein, or rather, Western Chow Mein is what I’ll be focusing on in this recipe.

TopRamen_ChickenNoodles, Noodles, Lo Mein Noodles

Never use Spaghetti noodles unless you want to fit in with all of the other yahoo’s out there that really don’t know what they’re doing.  You may not know either, but with this Lo Mein/Chow Mein recipe, you’ll be able to wing it like the pros and no one will be able to tell the difference.  You can, however, pull this off with Angel Hair Pasta, but I’m still not recommending an Italian noodle for a Chinese dish.  If you can pick up a soft noodle, something doughy or already cooked near the Tofu and egg roll wrappers in your grocery store, then that’s as good as it’s going to get, unless you make your own.  Though today, I’m going to show you how to do this with an all time very inexpensive favorite of mine, Ramen!  Nissin Top Ramen is what I’m using, with the chicken flavored seasoning packet.  You can literally use any flavor you prefer, but most Restaurants use a chicken or vegetable stock in their kitchen.  So trust me with this one because you’re going to need the broth even after you cook your noodles.

Cook The Noodles Al Dente.  This just means that you need to slightly under cook the noodles.  The reason for this is because they need to be cooked a second time when they are tossed with the vegetables, and this will keep them from getting over cooked and sticky.  Another important tip you need to know is the oil.  I have found that Peanut oil gives a more professional taste to the flavor of the noodles.  Don’t ask me why, because Chinese Restaurants will use Canola and even Soy Bean oil for their noodles, but I just don’t think they bring out that delicious fast food street vendor style of Lo Mein we’ve all grown to love.  For all I know, peanut oil is what the street vendors use.  I can’t be certain but it sure tastes right!

Ingredients:

1 pkg Noodles
4 ounces of Broth from the Noodle bouillon
1 tsp sugar
1/2 tsp Hoisin or Oyster Sauce
1/3 cup Peanut Oil
1 chopped Garlic Clove
1 1/2 Mixed Vegetables

Vegetables should include Cabbage, Onion and Carrot at a minimum, but can also contain Mushroom, Celery and Bean Sprouts.  Feel free to add any precooked meats like, Shrimp, Chicken or Beef.  Rob the 4 ounces of Broth from the Noodle bouillon and mix the sugar and your choice of Hoisin or Oyster to make the Secret Sauce.  Both are good but add a completely different taste so just choose your favorite.  Cook the noodles Al Dente and strain, then cook the vegetables in the peanut oil and garlic for 30 seconds, add the noodles and toss, then poor the “Secret Sauce” into the noodles and stir until the coloring is even through out the noodles.  The whole cooking process, tossing the vegetables and then combining with the noodles, shouldn’t take you more than 1 full minute to complete.  Serve the Lo Mein Family Style, on one plate, then dish out separately.