Chicken Stock Broth

Chicken Stock

Is Chicken Stock Broth?

Technically Chicken Stock and Broth aren’t the same thing, though, they basically have all of the same ingredients.  Stock, however, is more concentrated and thicker because of the added bones and the cooked down gelatin secreted from them and Broth usually gets it’s flavor from adding meat instead.  So to be clear, Stock is made using cooked bones, broth has no bones and is made by using the meat only, instead.  Various herbs, seasonings and vegetables can be added to each to flavor them up but other than that there virtually isn’t any other difference.  These recipes are usually cooked an average of 3 to 4 hours but some recipes claim they can be done in as little as 30 minutes and as crazy as 12.  The truth is there is no absolute way of doing it as long as the desired effect is reached.  My recipe is called a Chicken Stock Broth because I use the tips from chicken wings.  This way the tips, most would throw in the trash, don’t go to waste.  And, because there is such a small amount of bone in them, it gives a nice happy medium base, between a Stock and a Broth, with plenty of flavor for any recipe that calls for Stock or Broth.

Chicken Stock

Chicken Stock Bones

Most restaurants will use raw Chicken Carcass’s for their Chicken Stock.  But, unless you’re carving up your own boneless breasts and chicken thighs, they’re a little hard to come by.  Though Restaurants purchase these frozen, by the case, you most likely won’t be able to find them at your grocery store.  Though, a good butcher shop should be able to sell them to you, a good alternative is the wings.  Most recipes will suggest that to you but I say, “humbug!”  Wings are spendy and cost a lot more per pound than breast meat or chicken legs and thighs.  So save the wings for other recipes and just use the tips.  Wing tips have enough bone, meat and skin on them to flavor up and color any good Stock.  I personally just add them to a zip lock back and store them in the freezer until I need to make some.

Chicken Stock

Chicken Stock Herbs and Seasonings

A good Chicken Stock or Broth should have these basic ingredients; Onion, Parsley, Thyme, Bay Leaves and Garlic.  You go well over and beyond these or even cut back to the minimum Onion but these are the good makings for a good soup base or any other recipe that calls for Stalk or Broth.  The addition of vegetables will make it more hearty, so you end up with more of Vegetable/Chicken Broth; which is great because it adds more flavor.  Carrots, Celery and Leak are most commonly used; even Tomatoes, at times.  But if you want to add some heat you can throw in all kinds of different peppers and other spices.  In Asian cooking, it’s real common to crush ginger root and add that right along with the onion.

Chicken Stock

I mentioned that a good stalk is generally cooked for several hours and because of this there tends to be a lot of reduction in the stock.  But don’t hesitate to add more water and cook longer if you’re wanting or needing more Chicken Stock.  The picture below is my stock at the earliest stage of the process with all of the basic ingredients added that I’ve included in the list below.  Feel free to add anything else to this recipe.

Chicken Stock

Be sure to watch this short Chicken Stock Video tutorial below and I’ll show you just how easy this is to make your self.  Also be sure to look into any of my Cajun Recipes if you’re celebrating the upcoming Mardi Gras Holiday season.

Chicken Stock Broth Ingredients:

3 qt Water, approximately
1 lbs Chicken Bones, raw
1 Onion, cut in half
1/2 bunch Parsley
2 sprigs Thyme
2 Bay Leaves
2 Garlic Cloves
Salt and Pepper to taste, optional

This Chicken Stock Broth can last 3 to 4 days in your refrigerator.

How to make Pasta – Ravioli Sheets, Fettuccine and Angel Hair Pasta

How to make Pasta

 

How to Make Pasta Tutorial

I’ve been wanting to show you how to make pasta for quite some time now.  Mostly because I have yet to see a real good video tutorial that shows you, step by step, exactly how to do it.  So I put together this “fool proof” recipe that will teach you how to make the dough, understand it’s texture and know for sure when it is ready.  Once you understand this concept, you will make great pasta.  With out it, you will fail and most likely end up frustrated or, worse, possibly end up hating the whole procedure altogether  But the fact is, fresh pasta tastes 10 times better than dehydrated and once you see how easy this is you’ll never go back.

Another great thing about this recipe and the way I show you how to make pasta is that you can freeze the noodles in bunch’s or the dough in bulk.  And if you want to defeat the purpose of making fresh pasta, in the first place, you can hang the noodles out on a rack and let them dry, if you want, when they’re done.

My How to make Pasta video

This, “How to make Pasta” video recipe will show you how to make Ravioli or Lasagna Noodle sheets first, then Fettuccine and Angel Hair Pasta.  If you’re interested in some of my sauce recipes for these noodles check out my Alfredo Sauce(Olive Garden’s), Lobster Ravioli Sauce and my Alfredo and Cheese Sauce.

How to make Pasta Ingredients:

2 cups flour
3 eggs
1 tsp olive oil
1 pinch Salt

Add a few drops of water, to the dough, as needed and knead the dough for 5 to 8 minutes before rolling it out into sheets and cutting out the noodles.  The pasta only needs to be cooked for a few minutes in seasoned boiling water before serving.  But be sure to watch my video, How to make Pasta – Ravioli Sheets, Fettuccine and Angel Hair Pasta, so that you will understand exactly what to do.

Oysters Rockefeller – Cleaning, Shucking and the Recipe

Oysters

The Best Oysters are Rockefeller

Oysters Rockefeller are a great way to kick off any celebration.  New Orleans Mardi Gras is certainly no exception.  And as you may or may not know, the original recipe was developed in the French Quarter at local restaurant called Antoine’s back in the 1800’s.  This recipe has since gone platinum.  And you as you can see in the picture below, they are fairly inexpensive to buy and with this recipe, they certainly live up to their name, “Rockefeller”.  I think I paid about 58 cents a piece is all and the results were spectacularly “Rich”.

Oysters

What kind of Oysters do you have?

These are West Coast Oysters.  You can tell they aren’t from the East Coast because of the Greenish color, instead of brown, and they’re a bit more long gated as well.  They should always be scrubbed and rinsed before shucking.  This will help eliminate any grime getting into the shell.  Personally, I like to rinse them out after anyway.  But some folks will freak out if you drain the “liquor” from the oyster before serving because there’s so much flavor there.  But for Oysters Rockefeller, there is so much flavor added to it through out the recipe, in my opinion, it really doesn’t matter.  The important thing is that no one breaks a tooth trying to eat them.

Oysters

Shucking Oysters

I’ll show you, in the video below, how to properly shuck these things and lay them out on the half shell.  There’s really nothing to it once you learn the tricks.  But it’s important to lay them down on something that will keep them stable so they don’t teeter back and forth.  Some people, restaurants included, press the round shell backs down into Rock salt, and that’s great for serving but I just use cup cake pans to keep them from moving and it works great for broiling.

Oysters

Oysters Rockefeller

To make this recipe, you need a few key ingredients but the main thing is to make it green like money.  As the story goes, when this recipe was created, someone in the restaurant exclaimed that these Oysters were as rich as Rockefeller.  Others think it has to do with the color of money itself.  Either way, the name stuck and now the world can enjoy them for any occasion.

If you’re interested in other Cajun recipes and food celebrated in New Orleans and at Mardi Gras, check out my Boudin, Crawfish Etouffee and my Jambalaya!

Oysters Rockefeller Ingredients:

1 doz Med/Lrg Oysters
2 cloves Garlic, ground
1 Green Onion, ground
1 sprig of Fresh Parsly
4 oz Baby Green Spinach
2 tbsp White wine, can sub ice water or white grape juice
1 stick of melted butter (1/2 cup)
1/2 tsp Crab Boil or Crawfish Seasoning (Old Bay is fine)
1/4 tsp Smoked Paprika
1 tsp Worcestershire
1 tsp Basalmic Vinager
1/3 cup Fresh Parmesan Cheese, grated
1/4 cup Bread Crumbs, optional

Be sure to watch the full Oysters Rockefeller Video Tutorial so you can see, step by step, exactly how to make them from scratch.